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May 13, 2012

Maple cinnamon matzoh brei recipe

Maple-cinamon-matzoh-brei

Did you know that you can buy matzoh in the supermarket all year round, not just at Passover, and not just in the giant-size packages they sell during the holiday season? (If you don't know what matzoh looks like, here's a photo; it's a type of flatbread or large cracker.) In our house, we tend to buy the same plain kosher-for-Passover matzoh year after year, and to make the same matzoh brei recipe (my dad's classic) year after year. And we only make it during the holidays; I don't know why. I'm tired of the same old same old, and as proof, I offer this maple cinnamon matzoh brei (pronounced MAT-zah BRY), which is very much like a frittata or a really substantial quiche. Instead of the somewhat bland classic version that relies on salt for flavor, this sweet matzoh brei kicks off your day with cinnamon, maple syrup, and a bit of vanilla. I tested it on a group of friends a few weeks ago. There were no leftovers.

Maple-cinnamon-matzoh-brei-slice

Maple cinnamon matzoh brei

From the pantry, you'll need: eggs, matzoh, maple syrup, cinnamon, pure vanilla extract, butter.

Serves 2; can be multiplied.

Ingredients

4 sheets of plain matzoh
4 eggs
1 Tbsp pure maple syrup, plus extra to serve
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp pure vanilla extract
2 tsp milk (any type; I use skim milk)
Pinch of kosher salt
1-2 Tbsp butter

Directions

Place the matzoh in a large bowl, break it up into chunks, and fill the bowl with lukewarm water. Let the matzoh soak for 2-3 minutes, until it's soft but not disintegrating. Now for some wrist action: grab clumps of the soft matzoh, and squeeze out as much water as humanly possible. Place into another bowl. Repeat until all the matzoh is drained, and you have a bowl of matzoh clumps.

In another mixing bowl, whisk the eggs, maple syrup, cinnamon, vanilla extract, milk and salt until thoroughly combined. Pour into the bowl with the matzoh. Stir everything together.

In a 9- or 10-inch non-stick sauté pan over lowest heat, melt the butter, making sure to coat the bottom and sides of the pan. Pour in the matzoh mixture, and level with a spatula. Cover, and cook for 10 minutes or so, checking every now and then to make sure the mixture is not sticking.

When the bottom is brown, either (very bravely) flip the entire matzoh brei over in one piece, or cut it into quarters and flip each quarter back into the pan. Cook, uncovered, for 5 minutes or until the bottom is lightly browned and the eggs are set.

Cut into wedges and serve, with additional maple syrup on the side.

[Printer-friendly recipe.]


More recipes in The Perfect Pantry:
My dad's famous matzoh brei
Red pepper, asparagus and spinach quiche
Cinnamon and vanilla challah French toast
Maple walnut waffles
Asparagus frittata

Other recipes that use these pantry ingredients:
Egg and bacon French toast panini, from Panini Happy
Walnut maple pie, from Simply Recipes
Maple syrup pancake muffins, from Joy the Baker
Maple-cinnamon oat pop tarts, from Back to the Cutting Board
Caramel matzoh crunch, from Treat a Week Recipes

Comments

I've never heard of this before but it looks especially tasty ... Happy Mothers Day :-)

CJ, matzoh brei is one of the dishes I grew up with, and it's especially fun to make for (and with) a crowd.

Maple Syrup makes everything wonderful! yum!

Carol, my Canadian husband has been telling me that for years!

Interesting that you've evolved, as I remember you being a bit of a purist when it comes to matzoh brei - I consider this a worthy experiment. I would eat this up!

This is ingenious, Lydia. I've never bought matzoh before, but I'd be happy to try it with this recipe.

Cookie, thanks!

TW, yes, I'm evolving. I still prefer the salty version, but Ted loves the sweet one.

Susan, I've always taken a narrow view of what you can do with matzoh. Perhaps this is a holdover from childhood. Matzoh brei and noodle pudding were really all my mother made. I'm having fun using matzoh for lasagne now.

Question: If we make the Matzah bread by hand (I don't have the stuff in the box), how would you tweek this maple cinnamon matzah recipe? Less soaking time? And how much matzah would I use of the homemade stuff?

(I'm using this recipe for the matzah bread: http://allrecipes.com/recipe/matzah/)

Beth, I honestly don't know. I've never in my entire life made matzah by hand, so my hat's off to you for giving it a try.

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About The Perfect Pantry®

  • My name is Lydia Walshin. From my log house kitchen in rural northwest Rhode Island, I share recipes that use what we keep in our pantries, the usual and not-so-usual ingredients that spice up our lives.

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